Tag Archives: manipulation

Webinar: detecting image manipulation (2020/2/27)

(11 Feb 2020) From Elsevier Research Academy: “Advancing technology has put the control of scientific images in the hands of researchers and authors. According to most journal guidelines, images submitted with a manuscript for review should be minimally processed. However, with limited knowledge on the subject, it is difficult to assess whether the manipulation of an image is […]


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LPIXEL announces upgrade of ImaChek, the automated image manipulation and duplication checking system for scientific papers

(7 Nov 2019) LPIXEL Inc., a leader in image analysis and processing in life science and medical research, announced today the upgrade of ImaChek, the automated image checking system for detecting inappropriately manipulated and duplicated images in life science publications. Ever since its inception, LPIXEL has been on a journey to alleviate the problems associated with […]


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iLPixel releases ImaChek, a suite of image analysis solutions

(22 September 2017, Singapore)  iLPixel Global releases ImaChek, a suite of image analysis solutions for promoting scientific integrity and detecting image misconduct. Free trials are available for all first-time users of ImaChek Pro. ImaChek Pro : Tapping into advanced image analysis algorithms, the system automates the process to detect reutilized images. Users simply upload their […]


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Pote Lee, Founder of the iGroup and LPixel form a Joint Venture for Image Analysis

iGroup創業者と海外ジョイントベンチャー契約を締結いたしました。 (25 April 2016, Hong Kong) Mr. Pote Lee, founder of the iGroup (Asia Pacific) Ltd. is pleased to announce a joint venture with LPixel, the developer of groundbreaking image analysis technology and services with a special focus on image plagiarism. The LPixel team has led the world as a pioneer of video and image analysis in the life sciences […]


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Image manipulation: cleaning up the scholarly record

(2 May 2016) Image manipulation: acceptable practice in fashion, not journalism or science. Phil Davis in the Scholarly Kitchen website writes that most readers are experienced with image manipulation. We adjust the lighting, color tint, and contrast in our photographs. More experienced users will crop, resize, touch up a mole or some wrinkles, maybe even remove an […]


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