Tag Archives: LSE

Towards more consistent, transparent, and multi-purpose national bibliographic databases for research output

(13 November 2018) National bibliographic databases for research output collect metadata on universities’ scholarly publications, such as journal articles, monographs, and conference papers. As this sort of research information is increasingly used in assessments, funding allocation, and other academic reward structures, the value in developing comprehensive and reliable national databases becomes more and more clear. […]


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A librarian perspective on Sci-Hub: the true solution to the scholarly communication crisis is in the hands of the academic community, not librarians

(9 November 2018) Sci-Hub is a pirate website that provides free access to millions of research papers otherwise locked behind paywalls. Widespread dissatisfaction with scholarly communications has led many to overlook or dismiss concerns over the site’s legality, praising its disruptive technology and seeing justification in the free access it affords people all over the […]


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The growing, high-stakes audit culture within the academy has brought about a different kind of publishing crisis

(5 November 2018) The spate of high-profile cases of fraudulent publications has revealed a widening replication, or outright deception, crisis in the social sciences. To Marc Spooner, researchers “cooking up” findings and the deliberate faking of science is a result of extreme pressures to publish, brought about by an increasingly pervasive audit culture within the […]


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PhD theses – drawing attention to the often overlooked articles in open access repositories

(27 October 2018) Earlier this Open Access Week, university library staff throughout the UK celebrated #ThesisThursday, a day of focused attention on the less talked-about articles in open access repositories, PhD theses. Camilla Griffiths and Nancy Graham describe the work the LSE Library has led to digitise the theses of the School’s doctoral alumni, outlining […]


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Watch: Paywall: The Business of Scholarship (2018)

(27 October 2018) Paywall: The Business of Scholarship, produced and directed by Jason Schmitt, is a documentary which focuses on the need for open access to research and science. It is free to stream and download, and is licensed under the CC BY 4.0 Creative Commons designation. Universities interested in arranging a screening of the […]


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Plan S[how me the money]: why academic-led initiatives represent a more equitable, less costly publishing future

(24 October 2018) Plan S, announced last month, represents an exciting example of the scholarly community mobilising to create funding requirements that could lead to an open access future. However, the plan has also raised a number of legitimate concerns, not least the absence of any incentive for publishers to lower journal costs. Brian Cody […]


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As demands on the peer review system are increasing, reviewers are simultaneously becoming less responsive to invitations

(12 September 2018)  During this Peer Review Week 2018, Tom Culley shares findings from the new Publons “Global State of Peer Review” report. As demands on the peer review system increase, reviewers are actually becoming less responsive to invitations. Meanwhile, researchers from established regions such as the USA, UK, and Japan continue to review significantly […]


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Research data should be available long-term…but who is going to pay?

(7 September 2018) There is now a broad consensus that sharing and preserving data makes research more efficient, reproducible and potentially innovative. As such, most funding bodies now require research data to be stored, preserved, and made available long-term. But who is going to pay for this to happen? Marta Teperek and Alastair Dunning outline […]


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Predatory publishers threaten to consume public research funds and undermine national academic systems – the case of Brazil

(6 September 2018) An unintended consequence of the open access movement, predatory publishers have appeared in many countries, offering authors a quick and easy route to publication in exchange for a fee and usually without any apparent peer review or quality control. Using a large database of publications, Marcelo S. Perlin, Takeyoshi Imasato and Denis […]


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Alphabetical name ordering is discriminatory and harmful to collaborations

(29 May 2018) When multiple authors collaborate on an article, book, or report, the order in which they are listed is important. How this is done may vary by scientific discipline, with most determining the order according to the authors’ respective contributions. But some fields continue to follow the convention whereby authors are listed in […]


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How to keep up to date with the literature but avoid information overload

(18 May 2018) The sheer number of online services and social media platforms available to academics makes it possible to receive a constant stream of information about newly published research. However, much of this may serve only as a distraction from your research and staying on top of it all can even come to feel […]


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How to design an award-winning conference poster

(11 May 2018) A good academic conference poster serves a dual purpose: it is both an effective networking tool and a means by which to articulately communicate your research. But many academics fail to produce a truly visually arresting conference poster and so opportunities to garner interest and make connections are lost. Tullio Rossi offers […]


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The proportion of co-authored research articles has risen markedly in recent decades

(4 April 2018) The proportion of multi-authored papers in the social sciences has risen steadily over recent decades. But what are the reasons behind such a marked increase? Lukas Kuld and John O’Hagan consider a number of explanations, from increased academic specialisation and more affordable communication and travel, to the pressures of publication and an […]


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Releasing 1.8 million open access publications from publisher systems for text and data mining

(22 March 2018) Text and data mining offers an opportunity to improve the way we access and analyse the outputs of academic research. But the technical infrastructure of the current scholarly communication system is not yet ready to support TDM to its full potential, even for open access outputs. To address this problem, Petr Knoth, […]


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A brief history of research impact: how has impact assessment evolved in the UK and Australia?

(19 March 2018) Over the last couple of decades there has been an international push around the assessment of the wider societal impact of research. Kate Williams and Jonathan Grant document the evolution of research impact assessment in the UK and Australia, and how policies in the two countries have been seemingly interdependent, a back-and-forth […]


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