Tag Archives: LSE

Alphabetical name ordering is discriminatory and harmful to collaborations

(29 May 2018) When multiple authors collaborate on an article, book, or report, the order in which they are listed is important. How this is done may vary by scientific discipline, with most determining the order according to the authors’ respective contributions. But some fields continue to follow the convention whereby authors are listed in […]


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How to keep up to date with the literature but avoid information overload

(18 May 2018) The sheer number of online services and social media platforms available to academics makes it possible to receive a constant stream of information about newly published research. However, much of this may serve only as a distraction from your research and staying on top of it all can even come to feel […]


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How to design an award-winning conference poster

(11 May 2018) A good academic conference poster serves a dual purpose: it is both an effective networking tool and a means by which to articulately communicate your research. But many academics fail to produce a truly visually arresting conference poster and so opportunities to garner interest and make connections are lost. Tullio Rossi offers […]


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The proportion of co-authored research articles has risen markedly in recent decades

(4 April 2018) The proportion of multi-authored papers in the social sciences has risen steadily over recent decades. But what are the reasons behind such a marked increase? Lukas Kuld and John O’Hagan consider a number of explanations, from increased academic specialisation and more affordable communication and travel, to the pressures of publication and an […]


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Releasing 1.8 million open access publications from publisher systems for text and data mining

(22 March 2018) Text and data mining offers an opportunity to improve the way we access and analyse the outputs of academic research. But the technical infrastructure of the current scholarly communication system is not yet ready to support TDM to its full potential, even for open access outputs. To address this problem, Petr Knoth, […]


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A brief history of research impact: how has impact assessment evolved in the UK and Australia?

(19 March 2018) Over the last couple of decades there has been an international push around the assessment of the wider societal impact of research. Kate Williams and Jonathan Grant document the evolution of research impact assessment in the UK and Australia, and how policies in the two countries have been seemingly interdependent, a back-and-forth […]


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The hidden costs of research assessment exercises: the curious case of Australia

(13 March 2018) Research assessment exercises provide the government and wider public with assurance of the quality of university research, with the guiding principles being accountability, transparency, and openness. But is there the same accountability and openness when it comes to the public cost of these large-scale exercises? Ksenia Sawczak examines the situation in Australia […]


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False investigators and coercive citation are widespread in academic research

(5 March 2018) A recent study has revealed widespread unethical behaviour in academic research. Allen Wilhite focuses on two activities in particular; the addition to funding proposals of investigators not expected to contribute to the research, and editors who coerce authors to add citations to manuscripts even though those citations were not part of the scholars’ reference […]


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Impact Factors: an Academy of Management report on measuring scholarly impact

(2 March 2018) What constitutes scholarly impact? And which stakeholders have importance for research? Usha Haley shares findings of a recent Academy of Management report that sought answers to these questions by surveying its 20,000 members and conducting a selection of in-depth interviews with prominent figures. A majority of respondents indicated journal rankings did not […]


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More data or better data? Using statistical decision theory to guide data collection

(2 February 2018) When designing data collection, researchers must take important decisions on how much data to collect and what resources to devote to enhancing the quality of the collected data. But the threshold for choosing better over bigger data may be reached long before the sample numbers in the thousands, write Jeff Dominitz and […]


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Quantity does matter as citation impact increases with productivity

(23 January 2018)  Many scholars are encouraged to focus on the quality not the quantity of their publications, the rationale being that becoming too focused on productivity risks reducing the quality of one’s work. But is this, in fact, the case? Peter van den Besselaar and Ulf Sandström have studied a large sample of researchers […]


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Adoption of open access is rising – but so too are its costs

(22 January 2018) Options available to authors to make their work open access are on the rise. Adoption of open access itself is also rising, and usage of open-access materials is similarly increasing. However, alongside rising access levels another, less positive rise can also be observed: the costs of open access are increasing and at […]


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The concept of research impact pervades contemporary academic discourse – but what does it actually mean?

(9 January 2018) Research impact is often talked about, but how clear is it what this term really means? Kristel Alla, Wayne Hall, Harvey Whiteford, Brian Head and Carla Meurk find that academic literature discusses research impact but often without properly defining it, with academic discourses mostly drawing on bureaucratic definitions originating from the UK. The […]


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2017 in review: round-up of top posts on metrics

(24 December 2017) The LSE Impact blog touches on Mendeley, Google Scholar, altmetrics, Microsoft Academic, THE methodology, ResearchGate Score, and more, here.


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PhD students should be taught more about research impact and engagement

(18 December 2017) The international research impact and engagement agenda continues to gain momentum. But are early-career researchers, shown to be under-represented in impact-generating research, being left behind? Many PhD students report a lack of any training on research impact throughout their research studies, and even continue to conflate impact with dissemination. Melinda Laundon argues […]


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