Tag Archives: LSE

More data or better data? Using statistical decision theory to guide data collection

(2 February 2018) When designing data collection, researchers must take important decisions on how much data to collect and what resources to devote to enhancing the quality of the collected data. But the threshold for choosing better over bigger data may be reached long before the sample numbers in the thousands, write Jeff Dominitz and […]


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Quantity does matter as citation impact increases with productivity

(23 January 2018)  Many scholars are encouraged to focus on the quality not the quantity of their publications, the rationale being that becoming too focused on productivity risks reducing the quality of one’s work. But is this, in fact, the case? Peter van den Besselaar and Ulf Sandström have studied a large sample of researchers […]


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Adoption of open access is rising – but so too are its costs

(22 January 2018) Options available to authors to make their work open access are on the rise. Adoption of open access itself is also rising, and usage of open-access materials is similarly increasing. However, alongside rising access levels another, less positive rise can also be observed: the costs of open access are increasing and at […]


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The concept of research impact pervades contemporary academic discourse – but what does it actually mean?

(9 January 2018) Research impact is often talked about, but how clear is it what this term really means? Kristel Alla, Wayne Hall, Harvey Whiteford, Brian Head and Carla Meurk find that academic literature discusses research impact but often without properly defining it, with academic discourses mostly drawing on bureaucratic definitions originating from the UK. The […]


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2017 in review: round-up of top posts on metrics

(24 December 2017) The LSE Impact blog touches on Mendeley, Google Scholar, altmetrics, Microsoft Academic, THE methodology, ResearchGate Score, and more, here.


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PhD students should be taught more about research impact and engagement

(18 December 2017) The international research impact and engagement agenda continues to gain momentum. But are early-career researchers, shown to be under-represented in impact-generating research, being left behind? Many PhD students report a lack of any training on research impact throughout their research studies, and even continue to conflate impact with dissemination. Melinda Laundon argues […]


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The crumbling façade: my experience working for an essay mill

(12 December 2017) According to a recent UK Government-backed review, academics are topping up their earnings by writing for “essay mill” sites which help students to cheat in their assignments. S. A. Mills was one of those academics and recounts the experience here; offering an insight into the allure of such opportunities for those either […]


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Academic journals with a presence on Twitter are more widely disseminated and receive a higher number of citations

(4 December 2017)  Research has shown that researchers’ active participation on Twitter can be a powerful way of promoting and disseminating academic outputs and improving the prospects of increased citations. But does the same hold true for the presence of academic journals on Twitter? José Luis Ortega examined the role of 350 scholarly journals, analysing […]


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Open peer review: bringing transparency, accountability, and inclusivity to the peer review process

(13 September 2017) Open peer review is moving into the mainstream, but it is often poorly understood and surveys of researcher attitudes show important barriers to implementation. Tony Ross-Hellauer provides an overview of work conducted as part of an OpenAIRE2020 project to offer clarity on OPR, and issues an open call to publishers and researchers […]


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Addressing ethical issues in peer review – new guidelines available from COPE

(12 September 2017) Ethical issues related to the peer review process are increasingly complex and can be tricky to navigate and resolve. This Peer Review Week 2017, COPE (the Committee on Publication Ethics) released a revised, updated version of its guidelines for editors, reviewers, and would-be reviewers. These expanded resources include more information for early-career […]


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Journal policies that encourage data sharing prove extremely effective

(5 September 2017) There is currently little incentive for researchers to share their data. But what if it was enough for journals to simply ask authors to make their data available? Michèle B. Nuijten reports on a recent study that found journal policies that encourage data sharing to be extremely effective, with a steep increase […]


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There are new frontiers for academic publishing but scholarly associations and faculty must seize the opportunities

(24 August 2017) Scholarly publishing faces daunting challenges. Rising journal costs have seen many universities have to make strategic cuts to library collections. To Kyle Siler, the digital world has opened new niches and frontiers for academic publishing, offering many innovative and diverse possibilities. But opportunities must be grasped by scientific professional associations that have […]


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Survey findings suggest both individuals and institutions can do more to promote open science practices in India

(16 August 2017) How much have the open science movement’s practices and principles permeated researcher behaviour and attitudes in India? Arul George Scaria, Satheesh Menon and Shreyashi Ray have conducted a survey among researchers working across five different disciplines in India and reveal that more can be done to promote open science within its research institutions. […]


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Open Abstracts: a new peer review feature that helps scholars develop connections and encourages transdisciplinarity

(27 July 2017) The peer review process has been subjected to a steady stream of criticism in recent years. This has driven certain innovations, from revealing the content of the process post-publication, to crowdsourcing initiatives. Patrick Riechert and Frédéric Dubois introduce a new peer review feature that is currently being piloted on the journal, Internet […]


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Me, myself, and I: self-citation rates are higher in individualist cultures than in collectivist cultures

(4 July 2017) Citing your own work when publishing a paper may be seen as a way of promoting yourself in academia, as how frequently a paper is cited is often viewed as a measure of its importance. Previous studies have shown that male authors are more likely than their female counterparts to cite themselves, […]


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