Tag Archives: copyright law

Copyright in the Asia-Pacific Region: the right rules for libraries?

(27 Apr 2019)  The World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) is organising three regional seminars to understand how far copyright rules meet the needs of libraries around the world. The first one starts on Monday in Singapore, looking at the Asia-Pacific. IFLA will be there. Copyright is crucial to the work of libraries, as it shapes the […]


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Laos copyright law: EIFL review, recommendations

(14 March 2019) Libraries rely on copyright exceptions and limitations to allow everyday uses of copyright-protected materials, for example, to provide a researcher with a copy of a journal article, to make an accessible format copy for a blind student, or to make a preservation copy. For this reason, many copyright laws include specific exceptions […]


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Japan to extend copyright period on works including novels and paintings to 70 years

(10 December 2018) The copyright period on works such as novels and paintings in Japan is set to be extended to 70 years after the authors’ deaths, from the current 50 years, effective 30 December when a revised copyright law goes into force. The copyright law was revised as part of legislation to approve the […]


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A bright future for libraries in Australia’s copyright modernisation review

(5 July 2018) Australia is looking at reviewing its Copyright Act of 1968 with the aim of bringing its copyright framework up to date with the digital world. After earlier reviews such as the safe harbour extension, this time the government is consulting on a few specific aspects of Australia’s copyright. The Government sought to […]


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Changes made to Australian copyright law

(20 June 2018, Canberra, Australia) Important changes to Australian copyright law passed today will protect Australia’s education, cultural and disability organisations and help them provide better services to our communities. Under the Copyright Amendment (Service Providers) Act 2018 Australian disability organisations, education providers and cultural institutions will now be covered by the copyright safe harbour […]


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Government moves to modernise copyright in Australia

(26 August 2017) Australia’s educators, cultural institutions, disability organisations and tech sector welcome the Government’s commitment to modernisation of our copyright system and to ensuring fairer access to content for Australians. The commitment came as part of the Government’s response to the Productivity Commission’s 2016 Inquiry into Intellectual Property, which was released late on Friday. […]


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The Association of American Publishers welcomes major judgment against Sci-Hub pirate site

(23 June 2017, Washington, DC)  The Association of American Publishers (AAP) welcomes the June 21, 2017 ruling of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York regarding the willful infringement of scores of scholarly articles protected by copyright law. Ruling in favor of Elsevier, the publisher that brought the action, the […]


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Amendments to copyright a welcome step towards fair, affordable and open access to knowledge

(23  March 2017) The Council of Australian University Librarians (CAUL) is delighted to see that the Copyright Amendment (Disability Access and Other Measures) Bill 2017 have been in Parliament. CAUL is the national peak body representing university libraries in Australia and has been a persistent advocate for the Bill’s proposed amendments. The amendments arise from […]


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EIFL supports libraries and copyright in Myanmar

(31 January 2017) The copyright law of Myanmar was enacted over a century ago in 1914, and is one of many laws that are being replaced. It is based on the 1911 Copyright Act of the United Kingdom and although the law is still on the statute books, in practice it is defunct. Foreign works […]


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Copyright is not an inevitable or divine right, Court rules

(19 September 2016) In many countries it’s common for universities to print course packs, consisting of chapters of various educational books. This allows professors to use a tailored selection of literature they deem relevant for the course in question. However, not all publishers like this practice. They often demand license fees if the number of […]


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Turning the tables – how do copyright laws measure up for libraries?

(19 September 2016) The EIFL Core Library Exceptions Checklist – is a practical and fun way to help librarians to evaluate their domestic copyright law. What if library advocates had a handy way to measure the aspects of copyright law most important to them? Like the provisions that allow libraries to develop their collections, provide […]


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Orphan works to open access: Harvard Library publishes report on digitizing orphan collections

(12 August 2016) The Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication (OSC) is pleased to announce the release of a comprehensive literature review on strategies for digitizing orphan works for open access. An orphan work is any original work of authorship for which a good faith, prospective user cannot readily identify and/or locate the copyright owner—especially […]


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Rate my copyright law – how well does your law support libraries?

(2 August 2016) The EIFL Core Library Exceptions Checklist sets out provisions that every copyright law should have to support library activities and services in the 21st century, such as lending, making an electronic copy of a journal article or book chapter for a user, providing library material for use in virtual learning environments, and […]


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Thesis cheats beware! Academic plagiarism being made an offence in India

(26 June 2016) The Government of India plans to bring in a law to stop rampant plagiarism in academia, with punishment ranging from a warning to deregistration in the case of students and dismissal from service for teachers. Higher education regulator University Grants Commission (UGC) is finalising a draft law — the first of its […]


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Copyright meeting held in Hong Kong

(17 February 2016) A meeting between the Government, lawmakers, internet users and copyright owners was held today to discuss the Copyright (Amendment) Bill. Secretary for Commerce & Economic Development Gregory So told reporters the meeting was conducted in an orderly manner, but all parties have well-entrenched positions and failed to reach a consensus. He said: […]


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